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November 28, 2012
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the onion tree by RocCenere the onion tree by RocCenere
A quick painting of a fat tree, supposed to have a summery feel to it.

I want critiques in terms of pretty much everything, lighting, leaves, bark, trees in general, grass. Shit like that. I would super appreciate it!

20 mins.

(c) Ark.
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:iconperforex:
Perforex Nov 29, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I like the leaves a lot, what the other person said about colour variation is a great tips, I'd say some texture variation as well for the trunk and such, still there is some so that's good! I think the long grass straws could benefit from what you've done with the leaves, some individual colour daps and such, over all awesome though :D
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:iconroccenere:
RocCenere Nov 29, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Cool (: Good advice! I do still have to work on texturing until I'm better (:
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:iconperforex:
Perforex Dec 1, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Paint all the things :D Have you tried fur?
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:iconroccenere:
RocCenere Dec 1, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I will try it again when I get up to it (:
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:iconperforex:
Perforex Dec 7, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Huzzah : D Go forth!
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:iconaquilla-whingate:
Aquilla-Whingate Nov 29, 2012   General Artist
Well I an see the signature of the onion form wide at the base with roots flaring out, and above and its leaves in this case coming out the top. I do think really nice of this kind of speed paint, it is a nice little background landscape because of that, well done. :) :thumbsup:
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:iconquirkybrainiac:
QuirkyBrainiac Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:love:
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:iconumbravita:
Umbravita Nov 28, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I think it'd help to have some colour variation more in the piece. I can see you've done a good job with shadows/highlights -- it looks like you're choosing your shadow colours pretty well, and not just going "Okay so this is green so this bit needs to be a darker green", but rather being conscious of how shadows are different colours. You did that well!

What I'm talking about is the colour of the trunk, and the grass, and so on. No colour is completely isolated, it's going to have light reflected from around it. The trunk will have a yellowish tinge in places (highlights, for example) from the sun, but parts will also have the blue of the sky showing in the trunk. It's difficult to explain; you get it really starkly in reflective metals, but non-reflective non-metals also show it, too, just to a much more subtle degree.

(If you want to see it first hand, get a few pieces of paper with different colours in them, pick an ordinary object -- like a statue -- and hold each piece of card up to the object and see how different colours causes the light to bounce onto the object and reflect that colour onto it.)

The grass would have bits of brown in it, and the roots would reflect the green somewhat, too.

Things like that can really make a feature look like it's much more part of the picture. It can still stand out, but it also looks like it belongs there. I think the highlights of the leaves can use a more yellowish tone, along with the trunk. Though the shadows look pretty good from here! :) I also like the dappled effect in the top branches, where the light filters through the leaves and casts light on what was in shadow. Although the leaves are in such a mass it's hard to see how any light could have gotten through; splashes of blue and brown in the leaves could help show sky/branches past the leaves. Leaves are difficult to pull off though. :XD: I do like how you showed the individual leaves with strokes and dabs of colour here and there, that was done really well!
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:iconroccenere:
RocCenere Nov 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's really good advice, thanks heaps (: I've only recently been able to overcome my fear of shading things, I used to only give slight shadows, or I'd end up shading it and hating it. I do know what you mean with different colour reflections, you wouldn't so much get that with grass and the trunk due to the highly dispersive surfaces they both have, but you may get something to that effect with the sky giving even a bit of blue to the rest of it. Yep.

I do have to try a bit more with leaves and things. I guess this calls for more painting x3

Thank you for all of that, it was super helpful, I really do appreciate you taking the time to write that. I'll try and apply it in my next piece.
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:iconumbravita:
Umbravita Nov 28, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I've only recently been able to overcome my fear of shading things, I used to only give slight shadows, or I'd end up shading it and hating it.

Man, I know what you mean! I don't know if you were the same but I was afraid of using too much contrast. I found doing black and white studies helped me with that -- taking a ref pic, desaturating it, drawing a black-and-white version for 20 mins. Helped me learn to see how dark the shadows were and how light the highlights were. Still got a long way to go though. :XD:

Reflected light can be difficult. Some surfaces have it more than others. Sometimes it can be really subtle. Dispersive surfaces can still have them, but it'll appear more of a subtle tinge than a solid block of colour. :) It's a PITA, either way. :XD:

And, no problem. I am a critwhore and like giving crit too, so I'll always be happy to have a look at whatever you want crit on. :D
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